MEPs vote to ‘Protect Our Pets’ as the European Parliament adopts a Resolution to end the illegal trafficking of dogs and cats

European Parliament today adopts a Resolution to end the illegal trafficking of dogs and cats

“The USPCA welcomes the European Parliaments adoption of a Resolution calling on the European Commission to take action to halt the growing illegal trade in pets across the EU. This is a huge success for the Eurogroup for Animals’ Protect Our Pets campaign backed by the USPCA and launched in September 2015.”

Member Organisations of Eurogroup for Animals, including the USPCA, have reported a meteoric growth in the illegal trafficking of dogs and cats since the introduction of the Pet Travel Scheme in 2003. A system designed to allow owners to move around Europe with their pets has been exploited and abused for commercial purposes, often by organised criminals.

The trafficking of pets is estimated to be the third most profitable illegal trade after weapons and drugs within the EU.

The trade funds many inhumane puppy farms and countless backstreet breeders of so called ‘pedigree’ cats and dogs. Pets are transported across the EU without appropriate vaccinations and in horrific conditions, many contract life-threatening diseases which leaves unsuspecting buyers heartbroken.

The USPCA regard the resolution as hugely significant   “We wholeheartedly welcome the adoption of the Resolution by the European Parliament. It sends a clear signal to the European Commission that it is time to act to stop this horrific abuse of companion animals.” 

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The Resolution, which was coordinated by Renate Sommer MEP, and has been underpinned by Eurogroup for Animals’ Protect Our Pets campaign, which has seen over 500,000 e-mails sent to MEPs from right across Europe since its launch on 9 September 2015.

Many NGOs, including Member Organisations of Eurogroup for Animals, veterinarians and enforcement agencies have seen a meteoric growth in the illegal trafficking of dogs and cats since the introduction of the Pet Travel Scheme in 2003. This system, which was designed to allow owners to move with their pets, whether for work, on holiday or for pet shows, but has too often been exploited and abused for wholly commercial purposes, often by organised criminals. The trafficking of pets is estimated to be the third most profitable illegal trade after weapons and drugs within the EU.